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The earliest known ancestor of Thomas was Henry Chamberlayne, born 1709 and Christened in Lambourne, Berkshire, England. He married Elizabeth on 13 Nov 1740 in Speen, Berkshire, England. They had a son, Joseph Chamberlayne, Christened 1751 in Hungerford.

Joseph married Martha Birch at Wickham in 1781. Son, Stephen was born to them at Leckenhampstead, Chieveley in 1793.

Stephen married Jemima Brooks, the daughter of John and Sarah Brooks on 09 Jun 1839 in Welford. Their son, Thomas, was born 1821 at Winterbourne.

Thomas married Hannah Wale, the daughter of Thomas Whale and Harriet Cook, in 1844 at Winterbourne. By 1847 they had lost two children who had lived but a few months. Within this period they had converted to the Mormon Church as had Hannah’s parents and brother, George. The family heeded the call from their Church leaders to gather in America, at Zion in the newly settled Utah Territory (Deseret). It is here where the Church had migrated after facing further threats and persecutions in Nauvoo, Illinois.

Thomas and Hannah sailed first from England to America in the fall of 1848 and traveled by steamer to Alton, Illinois, a river town at the shores of the Mississippi and the confluence of Illinois and Missouri rivers. Hannah’s parents and daughter-in-law (George had died en route) joined them in Alton and they traveled together in the spring of 1850 to Council Bluffs, Iowa, where the Mormon trail began. They left for Salt Lake in 1852 and arrived in September, camping two days at the Jordan River before being called to an area 30 miles west of the city in the settlement of Tooele.

On July 14, 1854 Thomas and Hannah had a son they named Thomas. By the end of 1857 Hannah would lose her parents and husband to illness. In 1858 Hannah was married to John Gillespie by Brigham Young, in his Salt Lake City office. John was called in 1868 to the ‘Muddy Mission’, in what would be called St. Thomas, located in Clarke County, Nevada. His family accompanied him and they lived here until the town of 500 residents was abandoned because of a land dispute with the State of Nevada in 1871. At this time John went back to Tooele and Hannah and Thomas settled in Long Valley (present day Glendale, Orderville, and Mount Carmel). Thomas would later be an instrumental leader in the establishment of the United Order in Orderville.

It was here that Thomas was married to Chastie Ellen Convington in 1883. They had a daughter Reta Ellen who was born in 1899. Reta Married Edward Giles Carroll in 1918.

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The earliest known ancestor of Charles Negus Carroll is his grandfather, James O’Carroll who was born in County Armagh, Ulster, Ireland about 1768. Oral tradition suggests that he owned land in County Tyrone but that he was exiled to Newfoundland for reasons unknown and his property confiscated. It was here, probably St. Johns, that he was married to Margaret Pottle. The family record adds that James was contracted to marry Margaret by an English nobleman who was the biological father of her child, Terrence. James established a successful shipping business here where son, Patrick, father of Charles was born on April 25, 1789. James died in St. Johns in 1840.

Patrick married Nancy Negus in 1806. Nancy was born July 9, 1783. Another tradition suggests that Nancy was the daughter of Sarah Hawkins Negus who was compelled by her titled and wealthy father, Sir Henry Hawkins of London, to leave her children and return to London. It is supposed that because she was poor and alone she was persuaded to entrust her children’s care to the Lee family where Nancy was raised. She was called Anne to distinguish her from the Lee’s daughter ,Nancy, and was known by that name until her death. Charles related that there was a possibility of receiving property from Nancy’s estate but that the children never pursued it.

By the 1840s we find Patrick, Nancy and their sons, Charles, William and Patrick Jr. with their families in a place known as Carroll’s Ridge near Frederickton, New Brunswick. They cleared and established adjoining farms where, as Willard later recalled, they had a large log house with an upper loft and a porch facing the east, surrounded by a meadow with a spring house at the foot of a small hill not far from the main house.

William, Charles, Sarah, Patrick and their families joined the Mormon Church sometime prior to or during 1854 at Carroll’s Ridge. By May 8th, 1854 Charles was called as President of the South Hampton Branch, New Brunswick and led 46 saints, including brother, William, and sister, Sarah, to a new home in the territory of Deseret (Utah). They began the trek on May 11th when they boarded a steamer in frederickton bound for St. Johns, Newfoundland. From there they travelled to Boston, Massachusetts, where they boarded a train to Buffalo, New York. In Buffalo they boarded another steamer, crossing Lake Erie to arrive in Detroit, Michigan where they again boarded a train to Chicago, Illinois. From Chicago they travelled to Lowell where they boarded another steamer on the Illinois River bound for St. Louis, Missouri. From St. Louis they navigated the Missouri River to Kansas City then Fort Leavenworth, Kansas where the Church had established the “Camp of Israel”, the final debarkation point for the saints prior to outfitting wagon trains to complete the journey. It was here that tragedy struck and many of the saints lost their lives to a cholera epidemic in the camp, including Charles’ wife, Lucy and children, Fredrick and Emma. Charles’ son George succumbed on the trail a week later and was buried alongside the Sweet Water River. Charles and oldest son, Willard, although very ill, completed the journey and arrived in Salt Lake City on September 29, 1854 settling in Farmington that first winter.

The next year Charles and James Adams, his sister Sarah’s husband, purchased a large home from Jerome Benson in south Provo for the exchange of his team and wagon. The next two years he worked at Brigham Young’s saw mills in Big Cottonwood Canyon. It was during this time that Charles married Katherine Goddard, who had a grown daughter. However, she soon left with Johnston’s Army which had promised safe return to the States for any of the immigrants who had become disillusioned by the prospect of the hard-scrabble life in this remote and wild place. Afterward he married Kezia Giles, 24 years his junior, and found work that would keep him home, fishing in nearby Utah Lake.
In 1859 he moved his new family, including 3 week old Charles, to Heber Valley, an area he had earlier spotted after climbing to the summit of the range above the saw mills at Big Cottonwood Canyon. He viewed a lush and arable landscape, a choice place to build a home and raise a family. Charles was among the advance party of eleven men who travelled with teams and wagons filled with food supplies, farming and building implementations over the newly built road through Provo Canyon to the Heber Valley to begin construction of the new settlement. The journey which began in early spring would prove treacherous and daunting as the team had to tear down wagons and hand-carry them over snow pack that covered portions of the road. They settled near a spring located a mile north of present day Heber and called the place London as many of the men had originated in England. The initial town site was laid out and a fort was erected on the northwest corner as a protection from Indians. The fort consisted of small huts built close together in a rectangular formation facing one another providing a defense within the common area much like that of a wagon train circle. When the crops were planted and dwellings completed the men returned to Provo for their families and livestock.

As early as 1860 the community had a school and even a theater troupe that entertained the citizens through the cold, bleak winter months when they were cut off from the rest of the world. Charles was one of the leads. In the 70s Charles and Patrick were also members of the Social Hall Theater Committee which produced numerous plays. Charles and Willard also played lead roles in these productions. Charles served a city government position as an Assessor and Church position of High Priest Quorum councilor while residing in Heber. Kezia was a school teacher as well as a home maker. They built a home which had three rooms, a hall and summer kitchen in which he and Kezia lived for 20 years. Ten of their 12 children were born here.

In May of 1868 he moved his family to Orderville, a town in which its citizens followed the United Order, a communal life style where each individual worked for the benefit of the collective, a Church experiment in spiritual exaltation (to be continued).

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George Conrad, “Grandpa”, Miller instilled great pride in his grandson Leon R. Hunt.   He embodied the bold, self-reliant spirit that had made the conquest of this vast continent possible.   He was one of the last great “frontiersmen”, always looking for untamed lands to subdue.  I recall him from a photo taken at his Kansas farm, sitting tall in the saddle, six-gun strapped to his waste.  His father, Andrew Jackson Miller, must have shared this spirit, for he pioneered the North-West Territory and the Great Prairie of the United States in the forefront of its westward expansion.  

The origin of the surname Miller is the English occupational name for a mill operator, the individual who grinds grain into flour or meal, from the Middle English term “mille”. But, as the name and its variations was common and used throughout Europe, it is not known where Andrew Jackson Miller of Ohio and his ancestors originated.  The Irish potato famine of 1841 brought large numbers of Irish immigrants into the Territory.  Also, thousands of Germans and Dutch fled to this area of the country after the failure of the 1848 German rebellion. 

Family oral tradition suggests that the Millers emigrated from Europe and were part of the Pennsylvania-Dutch settlement in the Colonies and thus of German (Deutch) descent and probably “Muellers” or “Mullers” originally, later changing the surname to the Anglicized version, “Miller”. We can trace our earliest known ancestor, Andrew Miller, to Virginia where he was born in 1743.  This may have been in the West Virginia panhandle not far from Fayette County, Pennsylvania where we find some of the family a generation later but this area was sparsely populated in the 1740s.  In 1732 Scottish, Irish, Welsh and German pioneers settled Virginia in the area of Harper’s Ferry.  This is about 80 miles south of York County, in eastern Pennsylvania, where there is an index of wills that lists an Andrew Miller with wife and children that match those of our Andrew.

So if we are to speculate about the possible migration path of our Miller ancestors, it would originate in the valley of the Upper Rhine, Germany, where Penn had enlisted other religious reformists to colonize his land grant in Pennsylvania through his missionary work there in the last quarter of the 17th century.  The first migration occurred in 1683 and Germantown was settled near Philadelphia. Next they would move to Codorus Township, York County, approximately 100 miles west, close to the Maryland border where they may have found work in the tobacco plantations. 

We believe they then settled in German Township, Fayette County, not far from the western border of the state where new inexpensive land had become available after the French and Indian War.  We find Andrew’s children connected to the Franks and Bolsinger families from this area who accompany the Millers in subsequent moves. This may also indicate that others in the German community joined in this westward migration.

Conrad, Andrew’s son, was born in Virginia 1789, probably Ohio County; about 100 miles west of Fayette where the family had next migrated.  By 1850 Conrad and his family had moved 200 miles northwest to Wayne County, Ohio, south of Akron in the northern part of the state. Opal Miller’s Bible record notes Andrew’s family resided near Apple Creek. Actually, the census of the same year records their residence as East Union Township which is five miles east of there.  Here we find Conrad’s son, Andrew Jackson, who was born 1829 in Ohio. 

Fertile farmland and newly developed railway service may have drawn Andrew Jackson and other family members to Clayton County, 1000 miles to the west in northern Iowa.  This is where we find him, his sister Minerva and husband Christopher Bolsinger ten years later.  This area had already received an influx of immigrants fleeing economic and political turmoil in Europe in the 40s.  By 1861, in the midst of the American Civil War, we find Andrew Jackson in Dubuque where he marries.  George Conrad Miller, the first of Andrew’s five children was born October 20, 1862 near Dubuque in Colesburg. The family is found in the 1870 census in Mallory Township, 3 miles north of Colesburg.

There were no significant Civil War battles fought in Iowa but over 10 percent of its population of 700, 000 served in the military and more than 20 percent of that number were killed or wounded.  There are a number of Andrew Millers serving in the 1st, 5th, 6th , 9th, 11th,  15th and 21st Iowa regiments during the war. There is a Pvt. Andrew J. Miller on the roster of the 5th Regiment, Iowa Cavalry, Company L, a.k.a., Naughton’s Irish Dragoons, which actually originated in Missouri but included men from many different locales including Iowa.  There is another Andrew Miller on the roster of Company E, a.k.a, The Fremont Hussars, which formed at Dubuque and may more likely be related to our ancestor..

The economic panic of 1873 and the following economic depression may have prompted the immigration of many in the Dubuque area to free land in the West made available by the recent Homestead Act.  This departure was probably compounded by a severe grasshopper infestation that descended on the state in 1873 and subsequent years.  Many families from Iowa settled in Eastern Kansas, in Franklin and Osage Counties.  In 1875 Andrew Jackson Miller loaded his family and his earthly possessions in a covered wagon and immigrated to Kansas, where he homesteaded land in Osage County, near Lyndon.

George Conrad Miller, Andrew Jackson’s son married Isabelle Doyle on October 24, 1894 and settled in Osage County, Kansas.  He moved his family in 1903 to Ellsworth County, near Lorraine, Kansas and again in 1910 to Ness County.  They raised children, Isa, Ralph, Opal, Kenneth and Clara.

In 1911, George moved his family to a desolate section of “Homestead” land–probably some of the last government land grants– in southeast Colorado.  There he built a “dug-out” and animal sheds against the side of a knoll, using the slab rock from the escarpment, stacked one on top of the other to form the walls.  He transported his water from a stream on the far side of the valley. This frontier life was such a struggle for Isabelle and the children that she finally moved them back to Ness County.  But George remained living on the homestead for the five years required to claim the title.

Although some of the early accounts may be speculative, we do have public census, cemetery, personal Bible notations and other records to support much of our family history. Following is an enumeration of the available information.

The burial record for Conrad in the Old Presbyterian Cemetery, Smithville, Wayne Co., OH, which lists his father as Andrew Miller (b. 4 Apr 1743) in Virginia, (d. 13 Jun 1816) in Wayne County, OH.  He married Barbara Hook (1750-1818).  

Andrew and Barbara’s children are Barbara Miller (b. 10 Dec 1773), Jacob Miller (b. 11 June 1775) who married Dorothy Franks, Andrew (b. 14 Dec 1778) who married Catherine Kibler, Anna Katherine (b. 12 Feb 1782) who married Jacob M. Franks, Mariah (b. 19 Feb 1784), Conrad (b.24 Mar 1789) and Minerva Isabelle (b. Feb 1792) who married Christopher Bolsinger. Jacob Franks, son of Michael Franks, Jr. was from German Township, Fayette County, PA. 

There is an index for a will in Codorus Township, York Co., PA that includes Andrew Miller, wife, Barbara, son, Jacob, brother, George that may trace the family to the eastern part of the state.

In the 1850 census there is Andrew J. Miller, 21, in East Union Township, Wayne County, OH. His father is Conrad Miller. Conrad was born March 24, 1789 in Virginia and died May 18, 1877 in Wayne County. He married Elizabeth Kibler of Virginia (1804-1885). Their children were Andrew J. (b.1829), Nancy J. (b .1832), Ezra M. (b.1834), John P. (b.1836), Uriah F. (b.1839). There is another son of Conrad and Elizabeth’s who died before the census; William H. Miller (1824-1830). 

There is a marriage record in Clayton County, Iowa of Andrew Jackson Miller to Frances Cordelia White in 1861. 

The 1870 census for Mallory Township, Clayton County and Opal Miller’s Bible record note Andrew Jackson Miller (b. 12 Mar 1829) and Francis White (b. 12 Aug1843) with children George Conrad (b. 20 Oct 1862), Abbie Elizabeth (b. 29 Jul 1864), Ezra Washington (b. 19 Oct 1865), Mary Tamer(?) (b. 25 Oct 1871), Willie J (26 Apr 1876)

The Bible record shows that George Conrad married Isabelle Doyle 24 Oct 1894 and had the following children: Isa Mildred (b. 10 Nov 1896), Ralph Dewey (b. 15 May 1898), Opal Irene (b. 12 Jun 1900-d. 26 Nov 1949) married Isaac Sylvester Hunt 30 Apr 1921, Kenneth George Doyle (b. 19 Jan 1901), Clara Belle (b. 4 Nov 1904)

Andrew Jackson Miller died in 1912 and is buried in Scranton, Osage County, Kansas.

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Our first known progenitor was Ralph Hunt of Newtown, Long Island, New York.  He helped establish this settlement in 1652 with a group of Puritans led by Rev. Francis Doughty who had earlier fled to Rhode Island because of persecution in Massachusetts for their reformist views.  The Dutch colony was far less restrictive.  In 1662 the area separated from Dutch rule and Ralph was elected a town officer.  In 1665 they had formed their own militia with Ralph being commissioned as Lieutenant.  In 1668 as land grants were being issued he was appointed surveyor.

It is surmised that Ralph was born about 1625 in England and immigrated to the Colonies during the Great Migration from 1630-40.  He would have been a minor child at this time and because his parents are unknown we are unable to identify the family on a ship manifest although the Hunt surname is present on these records.  He married Ann, whose maiden name is unknown, around 1649.  We know from his will, administered by his son Edward on February 25 1676, that he had six children, Anna, Edward, Mary, Ralph, John and Samuel.  His children, grandchildren, great grandchildren and so on would first migrate to New Jersey, then North Carolina and on to Kentucky where some would split and migrate to Tennessee, Utah and Illinois.

By 1698 Ralph’s children and other citizens of Newtown had begun buying land in what would later be known as the township of Hopewell, New Jersey.  John, son of Ralph, purchased 500 acres there in 1714.  John, Jr., son of John married Margaret Moore on February 8th of the same year.  This is the father of Daniel who is the father of the first Abel in our lineage.

After having lived in the Hopewell area for a generation there was a title dispute on their land and the settlers were forced to leave their property.  They resettled in what would be known as the Jersey Settlement in Rowan County, North Carolina, near the town of Linwood where Abel, son of Daniel, was born in 1768.

From here Abel travelled the famous Wilderness Trail through the Cumberland Gap to settle in Barren County, Kentucky where son, Noah, was born in 1790 and Noah’s son, Abel, was born in 1812.

Noah then settled in Raleigh Township, Saline Co., Illinois around 1830, where we find Abel and his family in the 1840 and 1850 census.  Noah is named in his father’s will of 1822 (probated 1842). Noah’s son, Alexander, executed a deed from Barren County in 1846 recording his residence as Illinois.

Abel was 28 in 1840 when he is listed as head of household, but his oldest child wasn’t born until 1844.  Since Noah died in 1833 it’s likely that this was his father’s household and as the eldest son he took responsibility for their welfare.  Brother, James Allen was 10; Alexander was 12; William was 22; Mother Edith was 44.  There are land deeds from the 1850s that show Abel, Edith, William purchasing adjacent 40 acre parcels.  There is also a Gashum (Gershom?) Hunt who may be a relation.  The additional two males under 10, two females 5-15 and three females 15-20 may also be children of Noah’s for whom we don’t have a record.  In the 1850 Census we find William 32 (not married), Nancy 25, Eda 54 (Edith?), Alexander 22 and Allen (James Allen?) 20.  The three girls 25-30 are now likely married but we’re missing the 15-20 year old girl and two boys 15-20 years who may have become members of separate households by the 1850 census. 

Noah died in 1833 and was buried in the Bethel Creek Primitive Baptist Cemetery, 299 Bethel Creek Church Rd, Raleigh, IL, 62977 (37.842220, -88.552500) where Abel, his wife Nancy Parker, and children Noah W., Perry and Polly are also found.

Most of the Hunt family history, from Abel, born 1812, on, is fairly complete. Opel Miller Hunt, the wife of Isaac Sylvester Hunt, kept a record in the family bible. Isaac was the son of George Riley Hunt, son of Abel, and was born in Ness County, Kansas in 1882, where George finally settled with his family.

George, born in Saline County, Illinois in 1846, married Amelia Missouri Odle and settled in Eden Lake, Stearns County, Minnesota in 1867. In 1880 he and his family traveled by covered wagon to Ness County, Kansas (and a milder clim

A Summary of the Abel Hunt Family History

Our first known progenitor was Ralph Hunt of Newtown, Long Island, New York.  He helped establish this settlement in 1652 with a group of Puritans led by Rev. Francis Doughty who had earlier fled to Rhode Island because of persecution in Massachusetts for their reformist views.  The Dutch colony was far less restrictive.  In 1662 the area separated from Dutch rule and Ralph was elected a town officer.  In 1665 they had formed their own militia with Ralph being commissioned as Lieutenant.  In 1668 as land grants were being issued he was appointed surveyor.

It is surmised that Ralph was born about 1625 in England and immigrated to the Colonies during the Great Migration from 1630-40.  He would have been a minor child at this time and because his parents are unknown we are unable to identify the family on a ship manifest although the Hunt surname is present on these records.  He married Ann, whose maiden name is unknown, around 1649.  We know from his will, administered by his son Edward on February 25 1676, that he had six children, Anna, Edward, Mary, Ralph, John and Samuel.  His children, grandchildren, great grandchildren and so on would first migrate to New Jersey, then North Carolina and on to Kentucky where some would split and migrate to Tennessee, Utah and Illinois.

By 1698 Ralph’s children and other citizens of Newtown had begun buying land in what would later be known as the township of Hopewell, New Jersey.  John, son of Ralph, purchased 500 acres there in 1714.  John, Jr., son of John married Margaret Moore on February 8th of the same year.  This is the father of Daniel who is the father of the first Abel in our lineage.

After having lived in the Hopewell area for a generation there was a title dispute on their land and the settlers were forced to leave their property.  They resettled in what would be known as the Jersey Settlement in Rowan County, North Carolina, near the town of Linwood where Abel, son of Daniel, was born in 1768.

From here Abel travelled the famous Wilderness Trail through the Cumberland Gap to settle in Barren County, Kentucky where son, Noah, was born in 1790 and Noah’s son, Abel, was born in 1812.

Noah then settled in Raleigh Township, Saline Co., Illinois around 1830, where we find Abel and his family in the 1840 and 1850 census.  Noah is named in his father’s will of 1822 (probated 1842). Noah’s son, Alexander, executed a deed from Barren County in 1846 recording his residence as Illinois.

Abel was 28 in 1840 when he is listed as head of household, but his oldest child wasn’t born until 1844.  Since Noah died in 1833 it’s likely that this was his father’s household and as the eldest son he took responsibility for their welfare.  Brother, James Allen was 10; Alexander was 12; William was 22; Mother Edith was 44.  There are land deeds from the 1850s that show Abel, Edith, William purchasing adjacent 40 acre parcels.  There is also a Gashum (Gershom?) Hunt who may be a relation.  The additional two males under 10, two females 5-15 and three females 15-20 may also be children of Noah’s for whom we don’t have a record.  In the 1850 Census we find William 32 (not married), Nancy 25, Eda 54 (Edith?), Alexander 22 and Allen (James Allen?) 20.  The three girls 25-30 are now likely married but we’re missing the 15-20 year old girl and two boys 15-20 years who may have become members of separate households by the 1850 census. 

Noah died in 1833 and was buried in the Bethel Creek Primitive Baptist Cemetery, 299 Bethel Creek Church Rd, Raleigh, IL, 62977 (37.842220, -88.552500) where Abel, his wife Nancy Parker, and children Noah W., Perry and Polly are also found.

Most of the Hunt family history, from Abel, born 1812, on, is fairly complete. Opel Miller Hunt, the wife of Isaac Sylvester Hunt, kept a record in the family bible. Isaac was the son of George Riley Hunt, son of Abel, and was born in Ness County, Kansas in 1882, where George finally settled with his family.

George, born in Saline County, Illinois in 1846, married Amelia Missouri Odle and settled in Eden Lake, Stearns County, Minnesota in 1867. In 1880 he and his family traveled by covered wagon to Ness County, Kansas (and a milder climate) and established a homestead South-East of Bazine.  There he raised children, Noah Lewis, Nancy Eunice, Rosa Lillian, Abel Emmanuel, Dora Vivian, Florence Eva, Olive Iona, Isaac Sylvester and Essie Denien.  He built a home from hand-sculptured limestone that was quarried nearby.  It was here that Isaac raised his family, which included his wife, Alice Amrine with children, Lavon, Dortha, Marvin and Wilfred; then wife, Opal Miller with children, Harold, Leon and Chester.  Although deserted and in disrepair, the house still stands today.

ate) and established a homestead South-East of Bazine.  There he raised children, Noah Lewis, Nancy Eunice, Rosa Lillian, Abel Emmanuel, Dora Vivian, Florence Eva, Olive Iona, Isaac Sylvester and Essie Denien.  He built a home from hand-sculptured limestone that was quarried nearby.  It was here that Isaac raised his family, which included his wife, Alice Amrine with children, Lavon, Dortha, Marvin and Wilfred; then wife, Opal Miller with children, Harold, Leon and Chester.  Although deserted and in disrepair, the house still stands today.

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Tombstones

Hunt Family Tombstones

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Bethel’s Creek Primitive Baptist Church (monument at cemetery site)

Behel’s Creek Primitive Baptist Church was organized on June 17, 1820, meeting at first in the Karnes blockhouse on the S. E Corner of this property.

Worship services and singing were unchanged from pioneer days until services were suspended in the mid-1990s.

Foot washing and communion were observed twice each year, and practices such as Sunday School, a paid ministry, the use of reverend as a title, mechanical music and the formal collection of money were not observed.

Often referred to as “Hardshells”, it is their belief that the Bible is the only rule of faith and order, and adding unscriptural practices and doctrines were unsound and worldly, thus detracting from the beauty of Christ’s original Church.

The building built on this site in the 1870s was razed in 2000.

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Thomas Huskinson Giles Journal

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